Barbados Pocket Guide

Landship of Barbados

The Barbados Landship

Its not absolutely clear how far back the existence of the Barbados Landship dates back to but it became quite apparent that by the end of the nineteenth century, this organisation that mirrored the very structure of the Britsh Navy became quite familiar throughout the island. In an effort to retain the spirit and comaraderie that was shared while out on the ocean, this land-based version was created by Moses Ward, a Barbadian who served in the Royal Navy.

 

The performances of the Barbados Landship are based on the passage of ships through rough seas. Such performances are symbolized by parades, jigs, hornpipes, maypole dances and other music and dance types that are all part of the Landship Society's celebrations.

 

The ship's crew wears uniforms that are very similar in style to those worn in a professional navy. They are also trained and disciplined in the manner of the military. The language of "Jack Tars" is used. The landship attends church services and parades with their corps of drum (a tuk band). Their manoeuvres are gala affairs, packed with excitement, rhythm and movement.

 

Renowned for their many performances in public settings, the Barbados Landship is remembered even in 1966 when it paraded as part of the celebrations that marked Barbados' Independence.

 

The Barbados Landship has made such a mark on the island that it is almost incomplete to have a function or festivity on the island without the appearance of the group. The Barbados Landship is regulated by The Council of the Barbados Landship Association.

 

Meeting Turns

The Barbados Landship is also very much involved in the lives of its members and the community on a whole. It also acts as a savings and loan society that creates the growth and development of its people. "Meeting Turns" are kept as part of their commitment to society as these are outlined in the collections of monies in order to assist the underpriviliged, fire and or flood victims and the unemployed. 

 

A Meeting Turn is an arrangement by a small group where a fixed amount of money is put into a pool each week or each month. Meeting Turns are two-fold as they serve as a combination of compulsory savings and interest free loans that enable those who may find difficulty in saving and or acquiring a loan to do so through this method.

 

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Last modified on Tuesday, 21 September 2010 15:14
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