Barbados Pocket Guide

English Heritage

The Derelict & Dying Remains of Farley Hill House, St. Peter, Barbados Pocket Guide

English Heritage

The island of Barbados is seen as a unique island in more ways than one. It's geographical location, its culture and it's heritage, all combined aid in the birth and continuous development of an island that is filled with a rich history.

 

The English and their influence have prevailed in Barbados for some time now, dating back to 1627, when the first English settlers arrived on the island. Barbados gained independence in 1966 from Britain but continues to be heavily influenced by the English culture. Such ways are seen in the political system, the educational system, the religious diaspora, the legal system and cricket.

 

Barbados' Political System in Barbados

Barbados is currently separated into three distinct political institutions with each one having several subdivisions among them.

 

Barbados' executive power rests in the hands of the monarch - which is the Queen.

 

The Queen is represented by the Governor General who acts on her behalf.

 

The Prime Minister and his cabinet then advises the Governor General accordingly.

 

Barbados is a country with rich traditions and British influence. Like other British overseas territories, the Queen serves as the Monarch and the head of state. The Queen is represented by a Governor General who then acts on the advice of the Prime Minister and his cabinet. The Prime Minister is the true leader in government, but that does not mean that the Governor General does not have any influence.

 

Barbados' Educational System

The educational system in Barbados is predominantly styled after Britain's own educational system. All citizens of Barbados aged 5 up to 16 are entitled free access to free enrollment. There are three (3) levels of education in Barbados and there are Primary, Secondary then Tertiary.

 

The Religious Diaspora in Barbados

By and large Barbados is of Anglican descent primarily because in the early 19th century the majority of whites in Barbados were of Anglican descent and hence passed this way of life on to most balck Barbadian. Despite the strong Anglican influence, Barbados has been still able to successfully introduce other religions onto the island with some fairly large gatherings. Some of these other religions include but are not limited to Pentecost, Catholicism, Seventh Day Adventists, Bhuddists and Jehovah's Witness.

 

Despite the English heritage that is a part of Barbados, the people of Barbados have still been able to carry their own identity.

 

The Legal System in Barbados

The legal system in Barbados is founded in the British Common Law system.

 

The courts enforce respect for civil rights and assure a number of due process protections in criminal proceedings including a right of detainees to be brought before a judge within 72 hours of arrest. The Judiciary is independent and free from political influence.

 

The Supreme Court of Judicature sits as a high court and court of appeal; vested by the constitution with unlimited jurisdiction, it consists of a chief justice and three puisne judges, appointed by the governor-general on the recommendation of the prime minister after consultation with the leader of the opposition party. Magistrate courts have both civil and criminal jurisdiction.

 

The Game of Cricket

The game of cricket, the most popular sport in Barbados, has been passed down from the English to the people of Barbados. Despite the length of time that cricket has been a part of Barbados' sporting calendar, it is still very popular amongst conversations in the workplace, homes, parties, rumshops and public transportation.

 

Despite the fact that Barbados became independent of Britain in 1966, Britain continues to have  a strong influence on Barbados' culture and political climate even today.

 

Last modified on Monday, 06 February 2012 19:08

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